EMOTIONAL SPENDER: Buying based on how you feel can sink your budget

Everyone has bad days. Some are few and far between, and others can string together for what seems like an eternity.
Your job isn’t exactly panning out the way you thought.
You’re working too many hours, and find yourself completely stressed.
You may be in the midst of a porous relationship or can’t seem to get on track with accomplishing any goals, whether that’s exercising, eating better or spending more time with your family.
All of those aforementioned scenarios, at first glance, probably have very little to do with spending or saving money or your monthly or yearly budget.
Emotionally charged spending is quite a bit more prevalent than you would think, mostly because the people who participate in this tumultuous type of buying don’t believe it to be a problem. How many times have you heard the phrase “I’m having a bad day; I’m going to buy myself a present.”
Those famously foreshadowing words often lead to spending gratuitously to the point that you’re not only buying items you don’t need, but also are incapable of saving money.
This type of shopping hardly is confined to just clothing and can extend to food, more specifically, eating out in restaurants frequently, or simply redoing a room in your house with the purchase of expensive, unnecessary furniture and accessories that you simply don’t need.
The simple fact is buying makes you feel better in that very instant. Once the credit card bills or bank statements start rolling in, you instantly feel a sense of regret for the purchases you’ve made. When you’re in the midst of feeling bored, sad or not appreciated, it’s easy to fall victim to clever, savvy advertising that convinces you that you need a jet ski, even though you don’t like to swim.
The trick is channeling your energy away from newspaper ads or television commercials in favor of perhaps a leisurely stroll with a set of headphones. You might want to consider calling an old friend that you can seamlessly bounce your emotional status off of without fear of judgment or rejection.
This tips take only a few minutes, but ultimately will afford you with the wherewithal and restraint to banish that debit card back into your purse or wallet or filling out a credit card application at a department store while trying to hold back tears.
Buying and how you’re feeling today, this week or for the entire month run parallel with one another, but the key is capturing that emotion and transforming into something a little more positive than wrecking your budget in one fell swoop.